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Copyright

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Library staff will scan or digitize materials and review all requests for copyright compliance. Allow four weeks, or six weeks for requests that exceed MacEwan University Fair Dealing Guidelines and where copyright permissions must be obtained, to ensure items are available for the first day of classes.

 

Print materials

Excerpts of print materials, such as one chapter from a book, can be scanned and made available in Blackboard. This applies to both required and optional readings.

 

Video and audio

A streaming version of all or part of a video or musical work can also be made available in Blackboard. This is possible through an exception in the Copyright Act. The conditions of the exception must be met in order for the streaming copy to be legal.

 

Library databases (articles, ebooks, images, and streaming media)

The library subscribes to over 200 databases. Databases are online collections of articles, reports, data, streaming media, and ebooks and include access to over 71,800 journals and 1.2 million ebooks.

These collections are licensed and ready to use for teaching and learning in the classroom or in Blackboard. The easiest way to share articles, ebooks, and streaming media with your students in Blackboard is to provide a link. Students can then individually read, view, download, print the material as they wish.

Subject librarians have disciplinary expertise and can assist with locating and selecting materials.

 

Internet content

Content on the Internet is subject to copyright. Use by individuals and by educators is often covered by an implied licence, which would allow use without direct permissionparticularly when a site provides tools for copying, sharing and embedding content. Fair dealing can also apply to many uses of works from the Internet. Linking to content remains the simplest way to avoid copyright issues, but you should not provide students with a link to infringing content, such as an illegal post of an entire book

Class handouts

Subject to the MacEwan University Fair Dealing Guidelines, handouts of excerpts from copyrighted works, such as a chapter from a book, may be provided to students.

Coursepacks

A coursepack can provide a good option for providing readings to your students in a convenient package. The per-page copying cost can be lower in a coursepack than if students print readings themselves at public copiers or even on home printers. Coursepacks can be created by departments or by the MacEwan Bookstore. 

​The Bookstore will arrange for the compiling of materials from books and other sources and add a table of contents and bibliography when needed. Royalty fees for copyrighted material and printing costs are included in the price of the coursepack. The Bookstore will arrange for copyright permissions. Depending on the copyright owner, permissions can take as little as a day or several weeks. It is recommended that permission requests be submitted as early as possible to ensure permissions are in place before the start of class.

Contact Janelle Montgomery (montgomeryj11@macewan.ca or 780.497.4016) if you are interested in creating a coursepack or lab manual.  

 

Book reprints

Depending on the publisher, it may be possible to create a reprint of all or part of an out-of-print book. Royalties for doing so can be reasonable. Contact MacEwan Copyright Services at copyright@macewan.ca start a permission request.

Internet content

Content on the Internet is subject to copyright. Use by individuals and by educators is often covered by an implied licence, which would allow use without direct permissionparticularly when a site provides tools for copying, sharing and embedding content. Fair dealing can also apply to many uses of works from the Internet. Linking to Internet content avoids any copyright issues, but you should not provide students with a link to infringing content, such as an illegal post of an entire book.

 

Internet exception

The Copyright Act Internet exception provides additional support by allowing for the educational use of freely available web content. You can provide copies of qualifying internet content as handouts, posts to Blackboard or include them in printed coursepacks. “Freely available” means there is no restriction on access to the content such as a pay wall, password protection or other technical protection measures. A condition of this exception is that the content must have been posted by or with the consent of the copyright owner and there is no notice that disallows educational use. Content posted that is insubstantial or qualifies as fair dealing does not require the exception to be used. 

 

Linking

Providing a link to a website remains the simplest way to avoid copyright issues. You should not, however, link to content that has been posted illegally. 

 

Posting material on a publicly accessible websites

Posting course materials to a publicly accessible personal or class website would not likely qualify for fair dealing as it does not limit the distribution. Additionally, the Internet exception requires that material used under the provision be distributed primarily to students and staff of the university.

 

Music and video

Playing music and video

You can play all or part of a musical or video work in the classroom for the purposes of education or training on the university premises. Public performance rights for video are no longer required.  The source or copy of a video must be legal and can include a copy you own, a rented copy, or one borrowed from a library or a friend. Non-legal sources would include a copy downloaded from an illegal source on the web or a copy made from an illegal source.

 

Streaming audio and video

Streams of all or part of DVDs and tracks from CDs can be provided in Blackboard. This is possible through an exception in the Copyright Act. The conditions of the exception must be met in order for the streaming copy to be legal. ​Please log into Blackboard and follow these steps to have media added to your online course. Library staff review copyright on all requests and obtain permissions as needed.

Posting a limited amount of a video or audio work to Blackboard may qualify as fair dealing and not require permission. Consult the MacEwan University Fair Dealing Guidelines for more information. Web based video can be linked to or embedded into Blackboard if it is legally posted.

 

Library licensed streaming audio and video

The library subscribes to over 40 streaming media databases including classical, popular, and jazz music audio collections, as well as film including Criterion on Demand, which represents a large number of feature film producers such as 20th Century Fox, Paramount, and DreamWorks, and many educational video such Films on Demand: Nursing Collection, Kanopy, and the National Film Board of Canada to name a few.

These collections are licensed and ready to use for teaching and learning in the classroom or in Blackboard. The easiest way to share articles, ebooks, and streaming media with your students in Blackboard is to provide a link. Students can then individually read, view, download, print the material as they wish.

Subject librarians have disciplinary expertise and can assist with locating and selecting materials.

 

Web based video (YouTube)

Under the Internet exception, faculty and staff of the university may copy and use freely available web content for educational purposes. You may play a video for an audience that consists primarily of students and staff of the university. A condition of this exception is that the video must have been posted by or with the consent of the copyright owner and there is no notice that disallows educational use. See the Exceptions page for more information.

User-generated videos, commercial movies, television or documentaries that have been posted by or with the permission of the content owner may be shown in class and copied or embedded in Blackboard. Alternatively, you can provide a link to the page. This includes using an embed feature, which is equivalent to a link.

In some cases, the portion of a work posted to the web will be insubstantial enough to not be a copyright issue or the amount posted may qualify as fair dealing and can linked to or embedded even if it has not been posted by the owner or with permission. If you are unsure if this is the case, consult the Copyright Office.

 

Subscription and on-demand video

Services such as Netflix or on-demand video services from a cable provider are provided under a contract for home use. Performing or recording videos from these sources would not constitute video from a legal source and would not qualify for in-class performance or online streaming under the performance exception outlined above. 

Netflix, however, has shown that it will grant permission for the use of videos from its service in the classroom. Contact Netflix and get permission in writing (such as an email) or place a permission request with the MacEwan Copyright and Licensing Office.

 

Broadcast television, radio programs and live streams for classroom use

You may play any program to your class at the time of its airing.

A single copy of television or radio broadcasts recorded at the time of broadcast may be made and kept for educational use and performance. As of January 1, 2014, requirements to destroy a broadcast recording after a set period, or pay a royalty to retain or perform the copy, are no longer required.  

Recent court rulings suggest that live streaming broadcasts and Internet radio broadcasts are treated the same as over-the-air broadcasts. These can be played live in class at the time of broadcast. This would not apply to on-demand or downloadable programming.

 

Music scores

An entire score may not be able to be copied under fair dealing without permission. It is, however, permitted under the MacEwan University Fair Dealing Guidelines to copy an entire score from a book that contains other scores or up to 10% of any score, if that amount is useful.  Scores that have entered the public domain may be used without permission or payment of a royalty. An example of a site that collects public domain scores is the International Music Score Library Project

 

Audio and video for non-education purposes

If you want to perform music or a movie for entertainment or other non-educational purposes, a licence for the performance may be required. This can be arranged with the content owner directly or through a collective such as Audio Cine or Criterion Pictures for feature films; or SOCAN (Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada) for musical performances. Contact the Copyright Office for information and assistance.

Library databases (articles, ebooks, streamed media)

The library subscribes to over 200 databases. Databases are online collections of articles, reports, data, streaming media, and ebooks and include access to over 71,800 journals and 1.2 million ebooks.

These collections are licensed and ready to use for teaching and learning in the classroom or in Blackboard. MacEwan students and faculty can search across a number of databases at once from the library search page or access the contents of each database individually. The easiest way to share articles, ebooks, streaming media with your students in Blackboard is to provide a link. Students can then individually read, view, download, print the material as they wish.

Subject librarians have disciplinary expertise and can assist with locating and selecting materials.

 

Print readings on library reserve

The library maintains a print Reserve collection. The purpose of print Reserve is to provide equitable access to high demand, required reading materials. Faculty can place required reading materials, including textbooks, on Reserve for their students by signing into Blackboard and following these steps. Due to their high demand, these reserve items have a much shorter loan period, ranging from two hours to three days.

Using student works

Any original work created by a student is protected by copyright. This includes assignments produced for course work. The further use, such as publication by the educational institution, use in a faculty workshop, lesson or a post to a website, requires permission from the student.

Using textbook supplementary teaching materials

Textbook instructor / teaching packages and online resources are provided to instructors in conjunction with the adoption of a textbook for a course and may be used for the purposes the publisher intends. In most cases, the publisher expects you to use and adapt these materials in class and on a Blackboard class page to supplement the text. This permission is connected to the use of the text and will no longer be in effect if you change texts. Keep this in mind before building whole course plans or Blackboard courses around this material. If there is any question about whether you have permission to use this material, contact the publisher rep for clarification or contact the MacEwan Bookstore Learning Materials Specialists for further information.

This work is subject to a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial 4.0 International license. For exceptions, see the Library Copyright Statement.